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Working the Oyster

March 28th, 2016

Working the Oyster

I start working with a palette knife instead of a brush now. I like the loose look and texture it gives my paintings and it allows the underpainting to peek through, infusing a cohesive color through out the painting. A bonus is there are no brushes to clean. When I was striving to loosen up, someone suggested I try palette knife painting. It was some of the best advice I've been given. At first it was difficult and gave an unpleasant feel when applying paint, but the more I tried it the more I liked it. You have to mix more paint, as it doesn't spread as thin as a brush. I usually start applying color in the distance first, working my way forward, working dark to light in each area.

Oyster underpainting

March 27th, 2016

Oyster underpainting

I like to layer my paintings, it gives them more depth and interest. The first layer is a value study. I choose a color to compliment the main colors of the finished painting. Since the oyster will have a lot of blues, I chose transparent red oxide which is orangish, the complement of blue. It's my favorite color for underpainting, as it is transparent, so it glows in the lightest areas and is dark enough to give me a dark, but transparent value. I use only transparent red oxide and a solvent to create this layer, no white is allowed, it will cloud things up. Using a black and white copy to isolate the lights and darks, I paint in the values, heavier on the darks and thinner on the lights, wiping out the whitest areas. This step is done in one sitting, because after it dries you cannot reclaim your lights. The trick is to match your values with your next, color layer. I also like to let the under painting peek through to infuse the painting with a cohesive color. If it works this layer glows and looks so good, you don't want to cover it with color, but be brave. It gets better.

Starting a new oyster

July 15th, 2015

Starting a new oyster

A big sale over the Fourth of July weekend has me excited again and back in the studio. My inspiration is a small sketch of an oyster I did several days ago. I went back through my still life photos and compiled a new oyster. And I am pretty happy with the small sketch. I wanted a vertical format, it's easier to find places to hang. I hope I can capture the magic again.

Basic Supply List

April 6th, 2015

Basic Supply List

Start with these and add new colors, brushes and accessories as you learn. The Brush & Palette Studio, Hobby Lobby, Michaels and Utecht all carry painting supplies. Please bring in a jar with a lid and fill with solvent if you are painting in oils. As you paint you will need to replace colors and add canvases. A box or tote bag for holding all your materials is a good idea. The flat drying rack in the studio can hold papers, wet paintings and palettes. Call me if you have any questions 850-528-1961, and have fun! P.S. I posted a link of a another artist's basic supply list. You will find they vary from teacher to teacher.

PAINT COLORS:
a pre-packaged kit with most of these colors is a good start.
Alizarin Crimson, Burnt Sienna, Burnt Umber, Cadmium Red Light, Cadmium Yellow Pale, Cerulean Blue, French Ultramarine Blue, Titanium White, Viridian and Yellow Ochre.

BRUSHES:
1/4", 1/2" and 1" Flat brushes with firm bristles
#2 Round with soft bristles and a good point for detail work
#4 soft Fan or a Mop brush for blending.

SUPPORTS:
9 x 12 Pad of Canvas Paper is useful for exercises and as a canvas in a pinch.
8 x 10 and 11 x 14 Canvas Boards or Stretched Canvases are good in the beginning.

PALETTE KNIFE
Pick one with a trowel (bent) handle for easier mixing

PALETTE
A paper palette is a good choice to mix your paint on. 9 x 12 is a good size.

SOLVENTS & MEDIUMS
Oldorless Mineral Spirits (for oils)
Liquin Medium (for oils)
Retarding Medium (for acrylics)

NICE TO HAVE
Pencil, sharpener, eraser, paper, transer paper, spray fixative, art bin or tackle box.

INSPIRATIONAL FOLDER
Start a folder of pictures you would like to paint

beach paintings for sale

Painting Classes with Pam Talley at the Brush and Palette Studio

August 29th, 2013

Painting Classes with Pam Talley at the Brush and Palette Studio

Fall is here and it's time to start painting again! Classes at the Brush and Palette will begin the first week of September, but you can join at any time as long as there is space. I work with students of all levels in my painting classes. It's usually a nice group and everyone learns individually as well as from the group. Everyone works at their own pace, usually on a subject of their own choosing, unless they are just starting and then I assign several projects design to build basic skills and confidence. I believe we all start out from the same place and that just about anyone can learn to paint. It just takes time and practice. I also believe that we are all evolving and changing how we paint and what we like. I love the variety that everyone brings to the class. We all seem to like different things, and thats ok. It's a part of the world of art. I'm here to teach skills, be your extra set of eyes, and hopefully inspire you to keep painting. I love it and hope you will too.